Organizational Development is a long title for a large unbrella of improvement activities, both to profit and cultlure. When you start down the improvement path, you expect higher productivity, lower costs and bigger. profits. When you buy new equipment or upgrade equipment, you expect to use the capacity you paid for. You justify the purchase based on the value that the additional capacity will generate. You budget for the additional tons assuming that they will materialize. You also forecast lower costs for maintenance repairs and/or operating supplies. Then time passes…

Frequently many improvement dollars don’t materialize as forecast; sometimes they are never captured. Companies blame the improvement methodology or the project team or both for the shortfall and go in search of a “new and improved” methodology, joining the “flavor of the month” club. The dues to join this club are high; in fact, they are equal to the cost of resources, consulting, and equipment associated with each new effort to change.

If you have done everything you can to maximize production and minimize cost and still experience shortfalls in performance, hidden barriers probably reside in your management system. These barriers unintentionally sabotage improvement efforts, but go undetected during the change process and day-to-day activities.