No one but no one likes changes….except a baby with wet diapers. Sounds silly but is it true. One has to become a “Chameleon” and adapt to the change that is inevitable . With the excess and noise from so much social media, you have to be succinct at what message you are sharing. By reaching your audience with a content rich article that basically resolves a “pain” with the “salve” of information you have;

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Four Clues You or Your Staff are Having Problems with Change. 1.  Gossip Increases. 2.  Productivity Decreases 3.  Increase in Team Conflict 4.  Old Resentments Resurface Let’s talk about Gossip first, shall we?  Whenever I get called in to help an organization with gossip challenges, one of the first questions I ask is “What are the staff afraid of or having a hard time with?”  Gossip is usually a reaction to a problem they are

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Career management in this changing world is a bit like a chess game. You need to look several moves ahead. All of us will be judged by our ability to impact an organization, so here are some questions that to ask yourself to determine both those things that you do well and the ways in which you contribute: What particularly strong skills do you have? Of these skills, which show an exceptional ability? How are

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One generation knew exactly where they were when they learned of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. My peers know where we were when we learned of the death of President Kennedy. Likewise, I know exactly where I was on November 7, 1991. I was head of public relations and communications at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and one of my employees came into my office and said, “There will be a press conference in an

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While much of the nation is horrified by the recent scandals at Penn State University, they are not surprising in certain ways. Many of the characteristics that the university exhibited in the years leading up to these disclosures are not unique. We have seen them in other embarrassed  institutions, such as the Catholic Church, the military in the U.S. and around the world, many large urban police departments, and others. Do you recognize yourself, your

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The year is about half over. It is a good time for us to review our goals and objectives for the year and mark our progress. What, you don’t have goals and objectives for the year? If not, how will you know if you have advanced in 2012 and made personal progress? I keep two “To Do” lists posted: one for every day, and one for the year. My daily “TO DO” list is an

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I used to believe, before I did much thinking on the subject, and before Viktor Frankl’s book Man’s Search for Meaning showed me otherwise, that we are all victims of the genetics with which we’re saddled and the circumstances into which we’re born. I also believed that a sense of humour is something we’re either born with or without.  Over the years, and through the experiences rehabilitation bestowed on me, I’ve come to realize that I

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Before you go to your next meeting with a potential funder, you’ll want to be prepared.  Do your research about the foundation you are about to visit, and do your research about the philanthropic sector.  This is so important.  If you don’t do your research about the philanthropic sector at large, then you cannot possibly understand the underlying issues funders face, and the underlying themes of creating a successful relationship with a funder.  This knowledge will help

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Corporations, colleges and businesses are always seeking “qualified candidates” — for employment, freshman enrollment, or for position advancement.  For the life of me, it’s amazing what some organizations go through to find and recruit “qualified candidates”.  Some corporations use standarized testing such as Myers-Briggs.  Colleges will set cut-off scores on the ACT or SAT.  Graduate programs also use cut-off scores, either utilizing the GRE or GMAT tests. What is magic about a cut-off score?  Does

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