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MVP Blog Database

When to Say I Quit!

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

We are in love with the image of an athlete who guides his team to victory against bigger, faster, and more skilled opponents. We like it best when that player is a quarterback, banged up and bloodied yet plays through pain to will his team to victory. This hero story took a hit when Jay Cutler, quarterback of the Chicago Bears, allowed himself to be taken out of the NFC championship game because of an injured knee. Cutler admitted that his sore knee prevented him from playing at his best and so he went along with the coaching and medical

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Behaving Better for the Good of All

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

“Which corporate leaders do you admire?” was a question posed to me during a break during a leadership workshop I was conducting. In years past I would have rattled off a list of the “usual suspects” of familiar names with folks like Anne Mulcahy, Alan Mulally, Shelly Lazarus, and Larry Bossidy. Not this time! With respect to all of these fine leaders, who except for Mulally, are retired, I continue to be impressed by every day leaders, the men and women I have the privilege of knowing either as a coach, consultant, or interested observer. To me the level of

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Leaders Use Advisors, Not the Other Way Around

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

Advisers advise. Leaders lead. It is a leader’s responsibility to listen but not always to act on what she hears. That’s the difference between advising and leading. President Obama’s efforts to impose his views on the conduct of the war in Afghanistan bring to mind the example of an earlier president, Abraham Lincoln. During the first three years of the Civil War, Lincoln was served by military leaders who were either less than competent or, in the case of George McClellan, down right contemptuous of him. It was not until running through many generals that Lincoln landed on Ulysses S.

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Get Ahead of the Crowd

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

Leaders are agents of change. We change, as Harvard professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter has taught us, only when it hurts too much not to change. It is leaders who leverage the points of pain to get people to move forward. When the lever is first applied, the weight of resistance is mighty and so leaders must do it alone. They are sometimes out in front with few people to follow them. For example, consider the Civil Rights movement. One individual, who led from the front, and not always with much support, was Robert Moses. It was he who initiated and

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Questions You Can Ask to Resolve Prior Failures

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

“Tell me how I failed you.” A senior leader directed this request to an employee whose business unit was about to be dramatically restructured. The previous manager of the unit had done a poor job and the unit was in disarray. The senior leader was challenged with rebuilding the unit and installing new management. Being accountable for results does not mean merely being responsible for outcomes. It also means being responsible for what goes wrong along the way, especially when mistakes cause people and projects to go so far off track that an entire business falls into jeopardy. When leaders

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Leaders Get Ahead (and Stay Ahead) of the Crowd

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

Leaders are agents of change. We change, as Harvard professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter has taught us, only when it hurts too much not to change. It is leaders who leverage the points of pain to get people to move forward. When the lever is first applied, the weight of resistance is mighty and so leaders must do it alone. They are sometimes out in front with few people to follow them. For example, consider the Civil Rights movement. One individual, who led from the front, and not always with much support, was Robert Moses. It was he who initiated and

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The Time for Leadership is NOW!

Posted by Filomena Warihay, Ph.D. on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

It may be the best of times or the worst of times – but it is the only time we have. The poor economy, cut-backs on spending, staff reductions and other types of belt-tightening certainly don’t herald the best of times. Nevertheless, as a leader, you can take actions to ensure that some good comes out of the country’s economic crisis. Tough times offer opportunities for personal action and transformation. So instead of lamenting about the impact and length of the crisis ask: · What can I do to help the less fortunate in my community? Then, do it: today

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Character Lessons from Two Docs

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

Character is easy to define, but hard to quantify. It is fundamental to leadership yet describing beyond a few maxims, such as, “What you do when you think no one is looking,” can be devilish. Character within a context of leadership is example. This lesson struck home as I was reading the memoir of one doctor and later listening to an interview with another. Neither are physicians nor Ph.D.’s, but both dispense amounts of healing and wisdom in healthy doses. They are Doc Watson and Doc Simon. Both are in their eighties now and their approach to their crafts, Watson music

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Leadership Lessons from the Kansas Prairie

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

I love a good sports story. Athletes in pursuit of a goal make good examples of discipline and sacrifice in action. Even better is a sports story that focuses more on character development than just wins and losses. Such is the case with Joe Drape’s Our Boys, A Perfect Season on the Plains with the Smith Center Redmen. The first thing you need to know is that Smith Center is a rural farm town that like many farm communities in Western Kansas has been losing population since the turn of the last century. What it has not lost is its character

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Leadership Brand Is More than a Buzz Word

Posted by John Baldoni on January 01, 2000
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Category : Blog

This is especially true for leaders, because reputation is essential to getting things done. Since leaders accomplish very little by themselves, they need to bring others together for common purpose. How others perceive the leader is important to encouraging followership. Followership, which is based upon trust, is a reciprocal act. As historian and leadership author James McGregor Burns teaches, people follow the leader because they share similar values. A leader’s reputation therefore is essential to creating trust, and in turn getting people to work together to achieve mutually beneficial aims. How a leader nurtures his or her reputation is important

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